March 1, 2014
Carmela is 8 months old as of yesterday. At her checkup she weighed in at 34 lbs, and her vet says that she is probably not going to get any bigger. I am still waiting until she is about a year old before I start running with her consistently, but we are doing parts of our trail walks/hikes at a jog (about a quarter mile at a time several times throughout —- and only on trails) and she loves it.
I really, really love my puppy.

Carmela is 8 months old as of yesterday. At her checkup she weighed in at 34 lbs, and her vet says that she is probably not going to get any bigger. I am still waiting until she is about a year old before I start running with her consistently, but we are doing parts of our trail walks/hikes at a jog (about a quarter mile at a time several times throughout —- and only on trails) and she loves it.

I really, really love my puppy.

2:50pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLG8at18tgC3f
Filed under: puppy dog personal carmela 
February 24, 2014
http://black-shucks.tumblr.com/post/77727580961/mmmhoneycombs-winawinadajcie

mmmhoneycombs:

mmmhoneycombs:

winawinadajcie:

black-shucks:

amyogers:

haleysolo:

I’m always thinking I’m too lazy for any sort of higher energy dog because it’s so difficult with Potter, but then I remember that it’s so hard to get Potter to play and he isn’t trained enough on…

Oooh yeah I wouldn’t want to pay for nature either. We are probably moving just outside of Dallas. Hopefully there is some stuff to do over there D:

Sorry for butting in (I spend a lot of time lurking dog blogs and happened to find yours that way), but I have some recommendations for the DFW area. There are actually several really nice dog parks!

Railroad Park - This one is great for dogs who like to run, run, run. Even on pleasant weekends, it doesn’t seem to get too crowded and most of the time the other people/dogs are good.

Wagging Tail - I haven’t actually been to this one because I hear the parking is atrocious, but it looks nice.

NorthBark - This one is HUGE and has a big dog ‘swimming hole’ for dogs who like to swim.

All three of those are free. I am reasonably sure there are several others in the area, too.

There are also a lot of nice parks to go on walks and hikes. Breckenridge Park in Richardson is a beautiful paved path; Arbor Hills in Plano has paved + nature trails but it can get extremely crowded on weekends; L. B. Houston near Farmer’s Branch is a DORBA-sponsored mountain bike trail network that welcomes leashed dogs (and it’s almost never crowded); there are dog-friendly trails around Lake Grapevine; and there’s a beautiful nature preserve with some challenging trails called Cedar Ridge near Duncanville that never fails to knock out our dogs. All of these are free, too, although Cedar Ridge has a donation box out front. These are ones I can think of off the top of my head, but you can check out DORBA’s website for more information about trails. Most of them welcome leashed dogs and because DORBA maintains them, they’re in pretty good shape.

I’ve also used Meetup.com to find dog meet-ups in the area too, which is a great way to get a small group play date in. I hope that helps!

February 24, 2014
handsomedogs:



Vanilla beauty / / Mareike Konrad

handsomedogs:

Vanilla beauty / /

7:02pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLG8at18QaEAq
  
Filed under: dog 
February 23, 2014
man-and-camera:

Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada ➾ Luke Gram

man-and-camera:

Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada ➾ Luke Gram

(via wendesgray)

4:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLG8at18JVjkj
  
Filed under: nature 
February 22, 2014
floralls:

水色と桃色 (by **mog**)

floralls:

水色と桃色 (by **mog**)

February 22, 2014
We finally settled on a name for my puppy. We’ve been calling her Coco since we adopted her last month, thinking her full name would be Colette. We’ve finally agreed that Carmela is a cute and suiting name and that Coco can still be a nickname for it. I know Carmela is not an uncommon name in general, but in my case I got it from Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series. It’s my favorite series, it was extremely important to me growing up, and now all three of my pets have literary name origins (Pangur Ban, Simsa, and now Carmela —- Astrid is my boyfriend’s dog). ;)
So, welcome home, Carmela!

We finally settled on a name for my puppy. We’ve been calling her Coco since we adopted her last month, thinking her full name would be Colette. We’ve finally agreed that Carmela is a cute and suiting name and that Coco can still be a nickname for it. I know Carmela is not an uncommon name in general, but in my case I got it from Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series. It’s my favorite series, it was extremely important to me growing up, and now all three of my pets have literary name origins (Pangur Ban, Simsa, and now Carmela —- Astrid is my boyfriend’s dog). ;)

So, welcome home, Carmela!

February 22, 2014
floralls:

(by maruchaves.)

floralls:

(by maruchaves.)

5:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLG8at18CxE4F
  
Filed under: cat siamese 
February 21, 2014
photogenicfelines:

(Pavel Kraus)

photogenicfelines:

(Pavel Kraus)

10:21pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLG8at188Eue6
  
Filed under: cat kitten kitty 
February 21, 2014
metalliccolouredtitan:

who else here gets emotional about ffiv every fourteen seconds
anyone

metalliccolouredtitan:

who else here gets emotional about ffiv every fourteen seconds

anyone

(via shoujoh)

February 20, 2014
christinetheastrophysicist:

An Analysis of Comet ISON
Title: Preliminary Analysis of SOHO/STEREO Observations of Sungrazing Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) Around Perihelion
Authors: M. M. Knight, K. Battams
All eyes were on comet ISON as it was about to make its way around the Sun back in November. Unfortunately, it didn’t make it far before it disintegrated. In this paper, the authors present an analysis of photometric and morphological behavior of the comet before, during, and after its perihelion.
The authors’ observations of comet ISON were taken from the SOHO and STEREO images. With their unobstructed views of the Sun, the two telescopes were able to provide better views of ISON than ground-based telescopes.
To understand ISON’s photometric behavior, the authors plotted the comet’s apparent magnitude with respect to time. It was found that in the days up to perihelion, ISON gradually brightened, leveled off, and then brightened again. ISON’s brightness then peaked right before being blocked by the telescopes’ occulting disk. After perihelion, ISON began to fade, always appearing fainter than at its equivalent distance before perihelion. This fading brightness is consistent with the comet’s nucleus not surviving.
Up until perihelion, ISON had a central condensation—a distinct brightening within the coma—and a faint tail. This central condensation soon disappeared and the tail brightened. After perihelion, there was no evidence of a central condensation, fragmentation, or rotation.
The authors suggest that ISON’s behavior resembles those of small Kreutz comets. These comets follow orbits that take them very close to the Sun at perihelion. The authors do indicate that there have been instances where ISON’s visual appearance is similar to those of bright Kretuz comets and is consistent with a disrupted sungrazing comet.
Image: ISON’s morphology in the moments just before and just after perihelion. (from M. M. Knight et al.)

christinetheastrophysicist:

An Analysis of Comet ISON

All eyes were on comet ISON as it was about to make its way around the Sun back in November. Unfortunately, it didn’t make it far before it disintegrated. In this paper, the authors present an analysis of photometric and morphological behavior of the comet before, during, and after its perihelion.

The authors’ observations of comet ISON were taken from the SOHO and STEREO images. With their unobstructed views of the Sun, the two telescopes were able to provide better views of ISON than ground-based telescopes.

To understand ISON’s photometric behavior, the authors plotted the comet’s apparent magnitude with respect to time. It was found that in the days up to perihelion, ISON gradually brightened, leveled off, and then brightened again. ISON’s brightness then peaked right before being blocked by the telescopes’ occulting disk. After perihelion, ISON began to fade, always appearing fainter than at its equivalent distance before perihelion. This fading brightness is consistent with the comet’s nucleus not surviving.

Up until perihelion, ISON had a central condensation—a distinct brightening within the coma—and a faint tail. This central condensation soon disappeared and the tail brightened. After perihelion, there was no evidence of a central condensation, fragmentation, or rotation.

The authors suggest that ISON’s behavior resembles those of small Kreutz comets. These comets follow orbits that take them very close to the Sun at perihelion. The authors do indicate that there have been instances where ISON’s visual appearance is similar to those of bright Kretuz comets and is consistent with a disrupted sungrazing comet.

Image: ISON’s morphology in the moments just before and just after perihelion. (from M. M. Knight et al.)